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Archive for the ‘sculpture’ Category

NH

Untitled (Portrait) by Nikki Rosato

I recently wrote about the amazing creations made by cutting paper that we saw in an exhibition in the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, NH. It is Untitled (Portrait) 2016, by Nikki Rosato, American born 1986

One I omitted to add, and perhaps one of the most interesting is that of a head. It is interesting on two main counts: first, because of the material from which it is made and what that symbolizes; and secondly because it reminds us very much of another head, much larger, but just as symbolic (see further down). At first glance, they have a similar look, even though the size and the materials are different.

This one in the Deep Cuts exhibit is a three-dimensional bust made from cut road maps. The illustrations on the map look similar to parts of the human body: roads are like arteries and topographical lines form ridges and wrinkles. In this piece the artist tried to evoke the affiliations that people have with place and how places have shaped his or her development. This bust is a portrayal of the artist’s partner made from maps of New England and the surrounding areas that are significant to him.

This piece is part of a section called Altering Atlases. As the board explains, “For centuries cultures have created maps and atlases to define, categorize, and navigate their way through the world. Although many now rely heavily on GPS, the paper map remains an important, sometimes lifesaving tool for any adventurer (especially when we lose signal).

Maps symbolize not just geographies, but also the people who inhabit the landscapes and the geopolitical borders that divide and define them. Some artists alter these representations by cutting and abrading the paper on which they are printed in order to explore the politics of place and the relationship of humans to their natural and built environments…

What a great concept! As world travelers who usually use paper maps, we find this interpretation fascinating, because it’s true that people are also defined by place.

DesM

Nomads by Jaume Plensa

The other head this reminded us of is by Jaume Plensa (Spanish, born 1956), and I wrote about it here:

https://viviennemackie.wordpress.com/2014/04/25/symbolic-head-sculpture-with-multiple-meanings/

This head, called Nomade (2007), is huge and is painted stainless steel. The head and torso are made of letters from the Latin alphabet. His idea is that when letters are combined they produce words, thoughts and language, just as a person alone has limited potential but when people join together in a group or society they become stronger. It is in the John and Mary Pappajohn Sculpture Garden in Des Moines, Iowa.

SeoulInterestingly, we’ve experienced another head that is somewhat similar to these two. It is one of three head sculptures in the concourse of the Bongeunsa subway station in Seoul. I haven’t been able to find out any information about the artist or date etc.

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swanboats

Swan boats on Lake Eola

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The lady covered in green

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The lady being prepared

greenfacehandsMuse of Discovery

Outdoor Sculptures That Make You Think.

Found in Lake Eola Park, downtown Orlando, FL

As most people probably know by now, I am a huge fan of outdoor art of any type, but especially sculpture. Public art is so important as it’s available to all, and I don’t think anyone (except perhaps the current USA Administration!) would disagree that art enriches people’s lives in many ways.

Whenever we travel, I’m always on the look-out for public art, both new and that seen before.

I wrote before about the “Muse of Discovery” in Eola Park, Orlando. See here

https://viviennemackie.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/outdoor-sculptures-that-make-you-think/

So, we were delighted on our recent visit to Orlando to find the lady still there and to discover that she is organic and changing. I’ve included photos of both our visits, as a way of comparing.

earthfacehands

greenfaceTwo years ago, the lady was covered in live greenery and our then-5-year-old granddaughter dubbed her “The Lady with a Green Blanket”, which was very apt. At that time, the grass was ‘resting’ for winter and visitors could not sit on the statue’s hands, as the artist encourages the viewer to do. The artist invites the viewer to “ sit in the hand of the Muse and discover your hidden potential as she whispers to you”.

This time, we could sit on the lady’s hand but she wasn’t covered in greenery. In fact, a group of gardeners were working on the mound of soil over her body, preparing it for planting a lot of flowers. I’m sure that will look stunning in the summer.

earthfacehands2

us3The lady, with a very pretty face, is reclining in the park, her head, hands and limbs made of limestone. The information board tells us that the name is “Muse of Discovery”, by Meg White of Stephensport, KY and was gifted to the City of Orlando by Wayne M. Densch Charities, as part of the See Art Orlando Public Sculpture Program, 2013.

I can’t say there was an opportunity to discover hidden potential, as we were trying to get the kids to smile for the photo, but still it was fun!

 

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July 2016: MEADOWBROOK PARK in Urbana

The Landscape as it used to be in Illinois. Remember, Illinois’ nick-name (one of them) is the Prairie State, as hundreds of years ago much of the state was covered in tall-grass prairie.

We are lucky, as in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, there are many wonderful parks, but in our opinion this is Number #1.

Meadowbrook Park is a 130-acre park with a difference, beloved by the locals, including us! It has the usual facilities, like picnic areas and a large field for ball play. But, the kids’ play structures are different to usual playgrounds—super-sized, and made of wood.

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PA291402.JPGMore unusual are the large area of Restored Prairie, and the Wandell Sculpture Garden, a series of large-scale outdoor sculptures that line the three miles of walking trails and fit beautifully into their outdoor setting. The trails wander through and around a broad swathe of re-created tallgrass prairie, and organic and wildflower gardens, plus a large herb garden, and community garden plots. Each sculpture has a plaque with its name and the name of the sculptor, and it’s a lot of fun to wander along the paths and stop to admire the sculptures—some colorful, some whimsical, all interesting. The Celia and Willet Wandell Sculpture Garden opened in 1998, made possible by the Wandell family and donations from area businesses and local supporters. Some of the sculptures are owned by Urbana Park District as part of the permanent collection, and some are on a two-year loan from the artists.

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See the butterfly on the coneflower

Meadowbrook Park is lovely at any time of the year, but is really gorgeous now, at the height of summer. Tall, bright green grasses cover the fields across to the trees ringing the area. But the dominant color is not just green. Colorful wild flowers, massed, swaying slightly in the breeze, attract bees and birds. We watched a redwing blackbird perch atop a tall stalk with huge yellow flowers, nearby a small sparrow chirped on a bush with some other yellow flowers, a hummingbird hovered, and butterflies fluttered. White Queen Anne’s Lace, aptly named, polka-dots the green, along with pinkish Echinacea, bright blue cornflowers, and masses of purple and yellow, daisy-like wild flowers.

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Queen Anne’s Lace

deer

hummingbird

See the tiny hummingbird 

Sometimes you can hear a Chinese pheasant calling and watch for the deer, which are usually here, munching calmly, unworried by humans. A small brook runs through parts of the park and at times there have been beavers who’ve made a dam there.

If this kind of vegetation covered these prairies in days gone by, before the settlers came in and cleared it for farmland, the sight must have been truly awesome.

walking

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P7210043.JPGPeople come to walk, to run, to roller-blade or ride bicylces. They walk dogs and push strollers and near the pavilions people can picnic.

Whenever we walk, other runners, walkers, cyclists and dog-walkers pass us. Everyone smiles and greets us, the spirit seems relaxed and friendly. We are soothed by the beauty and perfection of this piece of Nature we are privileged to share.

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IMG_3973I’ve written about various animal parades before and the colorful fiber-glass creatures dotted around different cities—see here https://viviennemackie.wordpress.com/2016/03/18/animals-on-parade/ .

So, we were very interested to find one at Gateway Shopping Mall in Umhlanga Rocks in IMG_3974South Africa. Umhlanga Rocks is on the Natal coast just north of Durban and is in Kwa Zulu Natal Province. This cow is from a collection Cow Parade South Africa that was held in aid of the Childhood Cancer Foundation. This colorful cow has a very clever name: KowZuluNatal, a play on Kwa Zulu Natal, and is decorated with themes and icons from Kwa Zulu Natal.

The artist is Sibulele Mtshabe, and the cow was sponsored by The Scoin Shop and the SA Gold Coin Exchange.

 

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chief2

hailsignHonoring the Mohawk Native Americans

Reaching out with Hope

When we attended a family wedding in the Berkshires this October, one of the things I was determined to do was visit the “Hail to the Sunrise” Statue on the Mohawk Trail. Luckily we were staying nearby, so it was quite possible. And we were not disappointed.

The Mohawk Trail is a 63-mile winding road stretching east from the Massachusetts/New York line, close to Williamstown, to Millers Falls on the Connecticut River, just beyond Greenfield in Massachusetts. It runs through part of the well-known Berkshires, and is especially beautiful to drive in fall when the fall colors are truly glorious.

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You can just see the Chief directly behind the circular pool

chiefRodThe Mohawk Trail began as a trade route for the Native Americans of the Five Nations and connected Atlantic tribes with tribes in Upstate New York, hundreds of years before European settlers arrived. They used it to pass between the Connecticut and Hudson Valleys. It followed the Millers River, Deerfield River and crossed the Hoosac Range in the area that is now northwest Massachusetts.

Hail to the Sunrise” is a lovely monument just outside the town of Charlemont, Mass, about halfway along the Trail. The Monument consists of a prominent statue of a Mohawk Indian and a reflecting pool, and is the main feature of Mohawk Park, a roadside park on the Mohawk Trail. It was sponsored by The Improved Order of Redman, and Degree of Pocahontas.

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The monument honors the peoples of the five Mohawk Nations that inhabited western Massachusetts and New York State. The Mohawks who traveled this trail were said to be friendly to while settlers. Today the monument is a reminder of the area’s Native American heritage.

The bronze statue depicts a Native American man in traditional garb

chief

Note the arrowhead-shaped inscription stone

looking eastward across the Deerfield River with his arms uplifted in supplication. He faces the direction of the rising sun and is greeting the Great Spirit. The bronze statue, created by sculptor Joseph Pollia (1893-1954), rests on a 9-ton boulder. It was unveiled in October 1932, attended by more than 2000 people. The arrowhead-shaped tablet on the base of the statue reads: “Hail to the Sunrise—In Memory of the Mohawk Indian. The Mohawks of the Five Nations began to settle in New York State in 1590 and for 90 great suns they fought the New England tribes. The New York Mohawks that traveled this trail were friendly to the white settlers.”

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One of the inscription stones

The pool is lined with 100 inscribed stones from various tribes and councils from throughout the US. The grounds are open to the public and the park is a welcome stop along the scenic highway. It’s a great place to stop and contemplate Native American culture and history and how these peoples were so badly treated overall by the white settlers. For me, the man’s pose gives cause for hope, like he’s reaching out for a better future.

Charlemont is an old town, first settled in 1749. Every summer, the Mohawk Trail Concerts take place in the old, acoustically-perfect Charlemont Federated Church. They have been held here since 1970, founded by Arnold Black, a violinist.

 

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View to the Helderberg Mountains

View to the Helderberg Mountains

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASouth Africa: Lourensford Wine Estate, nicknamed “Jewel of the Cape Winelands”

Open daily

http://www.lourensford.co.za

Founded in 1700, this lovely estate lies in the fertile bowl of the Helderberg Mountains on the outskirts of the town of Somerset West (but is listed under the Stellenbosch wine route). It was once part of Adriaan van der Stel’s Vergelegen Estate nearby, so it’s steeped in history and heritage but has also espoused ultra-modern wine technology.

It’s another lovely estate with extensive, beautifully-tended gardens, all with the backdrop of mountains. So gorgeously “Cape”—in fact, I’ve almost never seen other wine areas anywhere else in the world that look quite as lovely as this. Some are more dramatic (Switzerland), others vaster (France). Maybe it’s the combination of setting and the Cape-Dutch architecture—green nature and white buildings. Whatever it is, it’s beautiful and a great place to relax, soak in the outdoors, and enjoy world-class wines.

The old slave bell, from the days of the Cape Dutch traders

The old slave bell, from the days of the Cape Dutch traders

The Coffee Roasting Company

The Coffee Roasting Company

Lourensford is a very large estate that offers a lot for the visitor. There’s the Tasting Room with a mini cellar tour, plus the Millhouse Restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating, a shop, a pottery shop, an art gallery and a coffee roasting company, which is a whole other tasting experience. Plus, there are trails and walks through the vines and up into the foothills—in addition to rambling the Estate’s own gardens and emerald green lawns. They also cater for events—our nephew got married here and said the Estate people were pleasant to deal with.

Well worth a visit and we suggest you allocate many hours, as each part of the visit is very leisurely—don’t try to be in a rush.

They take their coffee tasting seriously!

They take their coffee tasting seriously!

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Our multi-generational group enjoying coffee

Our multi-generational group enjoying coffee

Besides wine tasting, and eating in the restaurant (see an upcoming post), you should definitely visit the Coffee Roasting Company, open daily 9-5. They roast on site, giving the room that warm, smokey aroma of ground coffee. It sells coffee to go as well as being a small café, with some pastries, and a few gift items, like teas, coffees, chocolates, preserves, a few souvenirs, and lovely series of kids’ books called “In the Land of Kachoo”, about African animals. Many local people come here just for the coffee, to buy bags of coffee specially roasted to go, or to sip and savor coffee in the sun under a vine trellis or other fruit trees. That’s what we did late March, and it was a lovely outing for our multi-generational group.

The Art Gallery close to the Coffee Roasting Company is called Aleit & Is Art (the Aleit Hospitality Group makes a local beer on the premises—ABRU—which they sell at the Lourensford Market on Sundays).

The headless statue you see here is #3 (see below)

The headless statue you see here is #3 (see below)

Horse

Horse

In March the Gallery was hosting a special exhibition of outdoor sculptures, set up on the immaculate lawns. After enjoying our coffee we had fun walking around in the sun, identifying what the large outdoor figures were. They were all for sale, so maybe by now some lucky person can enjoy them at home or in another setting. The US $ and South Africa Rand exchange rate is roughly US$1=R11

Horse: “Let Loose”, by Florian Junge, R290,000 (roughly a bit less than $2900)

#1

#1

Number 1: “Indigenous”, by Marieke Prinsloo, cement, R76,900

#2

#2

Number 2: “Going and Staying”, by Pieter Robbetze, resin, R17,000

Number 3: I have called you by name, by Marieke Prinsloo, resin, R47,900

#4

#4

Number 4: “Elevation”, by Andre Stead, resin, R54,000

#4

#4

#5

#5

Number 5: “I want to be free”, by Uwe Pfaff, powder coated steel, R18,000

#5

#5

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"Embrace" at Villa Vauban

“Embrace” at Villa Vauban

Luxembourg statues

As people probably know, I really like tracking down outdoor art in different places. I think it’s true that public art (which is often outdoors) is an important part of the cultural identity of a city or town, and it’s fun to find out what kinds of art a city will support.

Here are two that I found in Luxembourg City last week—these do not include any of the commemorative statues and plaques in that city, as I’ll cover those later.

The first one is in the garden of the Villa Vauban, now used as the Musee d’Art de la Ville de Luxembourg. It’s titled “Embrace”, or “Enlacement” (French), or “Umarmung” (German). Bronze, 1976/1991. The artist is Lucien Wercollier (1908-2002), a well-known Luxembourg sculptor, who has works displayed in many countries.

Villa Vauban

Villa Vauban

martyrsThe other work is in the garden in the Place des Martyrs (which has a lovely rose garden in summer), opposite the former headquarters of Arcelor/Mittal (1922), the worldwide biggest steel company—a very attractive building, now housing the Brazilian Embassy, I believe.

It is by well-known sculptor Henry Moore (British, 1898-1986), titled “Mother and Child“. It was acquired by the City of Luxembourg in 2000, with the help of a donation by the Savings Bank.

Both lovely in their own way, but also kinda similar in form, I think.

Moore's statue with the Arcelor/Mittal building beyond

Moore’s statue with the Arcelor/Mittal building beyond

Moore's "Mother and Child"

Moore’s “Mother and Child”

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