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Archive for the ‘statues’ Category

men2More Public Art in Chicago

As I was walking recently  to the Chicago Cultural Center from our hotel I happened on this outdoor sculpture, one I have not seen before. It was apparently officially installed about two years ago.

Living World Series, Gentlemen, bronze on cast bronze plinth, by Ju Ming (1938-) from Taiwan. He trained as a woodcarver, but went on to an international career creating works in many materials. These figures are in bronze, but do have a look of wood carvings, I think.

On the plinth are a group of square, pedantic-looking men in suits and ties, some with menhats, or with bags and briefcases, and umbrellas.

This is on the AMA Plaza, next to the IBM Building housing the Langham Hotel on the north side of the river.

It’s an unusual  sculpture, and many people who walk by stop to take pictures.

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summerfield

Summer view to mountains

winterfield

Winter view

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Entrance to the farm stall

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Many creatures on the approach road

MOOIBERGE FARM STALL

This is always a good place to have lunch in the Stellenbosch winelands area as it’s easy to get to, the prices are very reasonable and it’s a lot of fun.

Mooiberge means “pretty mountains” in Afrikaans and the view out here certainly is that, as it’s right below the Helderberg Mountains.

 

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springbok

A Springbok (SA rugby team) and a Wallaby (Australian team)

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A Stormer (Cape rugby team)

On the R44 road between Somerset West and Stellenbosch, this landmark farm stall is hard to miss, as much of the property is “fenced” with a line of colorful art creatures/’sculptures’ (can we call them sculptures?) that the farm calls scarecrows and transportation creations. They are colorful, whimsical, and sometimes naughty scarecrows! Many of them are animals representing various sports teams, both South African and other countries. For many people, Mooiberge is “that farm with the crazy oversupply of scarecrows.” We wondered how it all began and in fact, the menu explains some of the history.

It started off in the 1950s as a farm stall selling strawberries, run by the Zetler family (Samuel and Josie Zetler and 5 sons), who later added sweet peppers too. As the roadside cart grew too small, they built a bricks and mortar stall that blossomed/mushroomed out into what we see today—a colorful, sprawling complex.

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Some of the crafts in the modern farm stall

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Cape gooseberries for sale

sauces

What about some Mama Africa’s hot sauce?

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Thirsty Scarecrow play area

Some might say it’s a kitschy produce market-cum-wine shop-cum-market for bottled goods (jams, sauces, olive oils for example), cakes, nuts, biltong, local crafts, wine barrels, fruits and vegetables. But, it’s undoubtedly a lot of fun. We once bought a bottle of wine for R25—one of their advertised specials. They seem to have many of the specials for various airlines.

It’s a great place to take kids in the strawberry season (November-January or February), as the strawberry picking is very popular. There’s a wonderful play area called the Thirsty Scarecrow, which the kids in our group loved on the last visit.

 

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Caroline M, Rod M, and Anthea K enjoy lunch

Over the years we’ve been here many times to eat lunch and it’s always been great. In the winter, there’s obviously no strawberry picking and the rows of plants are all covered in plastic. But, it’s still a great lunch place, as it has a fun atmosphere because of the setting and very good food—a tasty meal, with very generous servings, of fresh, locally-sourced ingredients.

The outside deck where you can sit looks out over the kids play area and across the pepper/strawberry fields to the mountains, the whole view enlivened by the bright, quirky, animals (mostly) sculptures—which in general you’d say don’t fit into this (wine) environment, and yet they’ve become a local fixture and a tourist feature and attraction.

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Miss E at entrance to Farmers Kitchen

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One of their delicious salads

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Rod M has the lamb burger

The restaurant is called the Farmer’s Kitchen, which re-opened in September 2011 after new owner Kelly Zetler revamped it, to “French colonial meets rustic countryside comfort”. Its hours are 8:30am-5pm, and they specialize in breakfast, snack meals and lunch, with many dishes featuring strawberries in season.

At different times over the years, members of our party have tried many items on the menu. Some of the favorites are a huge lamb burger with Greek-style cucumber-yoghurt sauce; an avocado and chicken wrap; a bacon, brie and walnut pizza, served with salad; a parma ham and fresh fig salad; and a fresh salad with pomegranate and goat cheese. They also have very good meat and cheese platters. The house wine is Du Toitskloof sauvignon blanc and there is also beer, hard cider and all kinds of cold and hot drinks.

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Another great salad

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We look down at rugby player scarecrows from the restaurant

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More creatures

Also in the Mooiberge complex is the Thirsty Scarecrow Bistro-Pub, open Mon-Sun 11am-11:30pm.

Mooiberge the Farm Stall is open Mon-Sun 8:30am-6pm.

This should definitely be on the list for anyone visiting the Cape Town and Stellenbosch winelands.

tractor

Mooiberge’s first tractor

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coppercatUrbana, IL: Mountain Lion in Town

Walking on Main Street in downtown Urbana the other day I came across an intriguing outdoor sculpture in front of the Cinema Gallery. A lean, metal feline.

It’s “Western Mountain Lion”, 2015, by Tim Summerville from a small nearby town, St Joseph, IL and it’s sponsored by the Cinema Gallery.

This fierce-looking lion is made of ¼-inch rods, with 660 feet in total, and it weighs about 120 pounds.coppercat2

Summerville describes himself as a copper sculpture artist. Each sculpture is created using large copper sheets and simple hand tools. Elements of the design are free-hand hammered using no forms or patterns. They are joined together with a copper alloy brazing rod and an oxy-acetylene torch, which makes a very strong joint.

He has made many birds (small hummingbirds, herons, red-tailed hawk, for example) and a rooster weather vane. He’s also done copper bird-houses, and bird feeders.

Nice to have such talent in our midst.

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squarefromend

The enormous Vrijthof Square

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One side of the square is lined with very nice cafes

Maastricht is the charming capital of the province of Limburg, right in the south of Netherlands. It has many narrow picturesque streets and small squares, and lovely old houses, many from the 16th and 17th centuries. You also see remains of the old fortifications and old city walls, testament to the town’s strategic importance at a European crossroads and that it withstood 21 sieges over the centuries.

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St Jans Kerk, St Servaas Basilica, and the Hoofwacht on the far side of the square

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The churches lit up at night

Most of its squares are small and enclosed, which is why the Vrijthof comes as a bit of a surprise. In the heart of the city, it is very large, a huge open space lined on three sides with trees, and on one side by lovely café terraces. Many pedestrianized shopping streets radiate out from it. It’s dominated by the vast and ancient Romanesque St Servaas Cathedral, and behind that the St Jans Kerk from the 12-15th centuries.

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Spanish Government House

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Emblem on Hoofwacht

On the south side is the old Spanish Government House (was the residence of the Dukes of Brabant and the Spanish kings), now the Museum of the Vrijthof and painted bright red/pink. On the west is the Hoofdwacht (1700s), once a guard house and now a military headquarters.

On Vrijthof, you can almost forget you’re in the Netherlands. When you stand in the middle and look around, it doesn’t look or feel like other Dutch squares, as it’s enormous and is the cultural heart of the city. It’s usually wide and open, but also hosts jam-packed events: from Carnival; to becoming the beautiful backdrop for the concerts by local favorite Andre Rieu; to the Preuvenemint, the Netherlands largest food festival.

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The cafes in early evening  light

What’s in a name? According to one tradition, the name means “free place” or “sanctuary”, but it more likely derives from the German for cemetery, two of which were known to have occupied this site.

The square was built on the marshes of the River Jeker. The area was

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Note statues far left, and the fountain front

originally unsuitable for building but by medieval times was used as a military parade ground, an execution site and a pilgrims’ meeting place. Every 7 years, the Fair of the Holy Relics attracted pilgrims, craftsmen and traders to the lively square. Something of this spirit is recaptured in Vrijthof at Carnival time these days.

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St Servaas as backdrop to 2 of the Carnival statues

The square’s connection to Carnival is strong. Besides being one of the main venues for carnival activities in the city, it boasts several permanent carnival reminders. On the SW corner is a group of 5 colorful and oddly-shaped sculpted figures of different sizes. They depict players from a carnival marching band (see details in an upcoming post).

Close by is a small fountain, whose 5 bronze figures depict masked carnival figures dancing hand-in-hand. Called “Hawt Uuch Vas!” by Frans Gast, 1976.

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One side of the square is lined with lovely old buildings, now cafes, bars and brasseries. One, roughly in the middle, is a bit more ornate than the others. It’s the Grand Café Momus and it used to be the carnival hall. Their logo is still a carnival mask, which features on the chairs and menu.

We ate there one evening—see an upcoming post.

 

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Art

A pretty stroll along the top of the city walls will eventually get you to the statue

A pretty stroll along the top of the city walls will eventually get you to the statue

A dashing hero!

A dashing hero!

We went looking for this statue of d’Artagnan in Maastricht and eventually found it, a bit further west along the old city walls that we first realized. It’s just outside the walls on the edge of the long park that borders the walls on the south of the city. It’s situated here, because it’s here that he was killed in the Franco-Dutch War.

We found the statue very complimentary, portraying the musketeer as a handsome, swash-buckling noble. The legendary hat, cloak and sword are very obvious.

So, who was this d’Artagnan?

Viv M poses---D'Artagnan is as much myth as reality these days it seems

Viv M poses—D’Artagnan is as much myth as reality these days it seems

A canon close by, to remind us there have been numerous wars here

A canon close by, to remind us there have been numerous wars here

Charles de Batz de Castelmore, Comte d’Artagnan: born ca 1611, in Lupiac southwest France; died June 25, 1673 in Maastricht during the Franco-Dutch War.

D’Artagnan served King Louis XIV as captain of the Musketeers of the Guard from 1632 until his death. During this time he had many famous assignments. He also served his protector, Cardinal Mazarin. Gatien de Sandras wrote a fictionalized account of d’Artagnan’s life, which served as the basis for the romances of Alexandre Dumas, the most famous probably being “The Three Musketeers”.

Dumas’s fictionalized version and the subsequent screen adaptations are probably far more widely known that the real life of this historical figure. A real case of fact and fiction being so closely inter-twined that it’s hard to tell the one from the other any more.

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