Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Zagreb’

Entrance lobby. Note the clever sign/logo with the break in it

Entrance lobby. Note the clever sign/logo with the break in it

Museum banner

Museum banner

Museum of Broken Relationships

As you wander around the Upper Old Town in Zagreb, you will come across an intriguing and unusual museum not far from the lovely St Mark’s Square with its Church of St Mark. The Museum of Broken Relationships grew from a traveling exhibition centered around the concept of failed relationships, their ruins and repercussions. Unlike “self-help” instructions for recovery from failed or lost loves, this museum offers a chance to overcome emotional stress through a creative process, by contributing to the museum collection. And people all over the world have contributed, by the thousands.

Conceptualized in Croatia and located permanently in the historical part of Zagreb, the museum has toured internationally in over 25 cities so far, including Taipei, Paris, Berlin, Cape Town, Singapore, and Kilkenny, Ireland. In 2013, it traveled to Taiwan, Boulder (Colorado, USA), and Paris (France). Currently there is an exhibition in Amsterdam (see below).

Some of the rooms are all white. Rod reads about the key (see next pics)

Some of the rooms are all white. Rod reads about the key (see next pics)

The museum’s exhibits take the viewer on a unique emotional journey around the world through a variety of items symbolizing break-ups in relationships. The founders realized that most societies around the world have special ceremonies to mark events such as births, deaths, marriages, graduations, and retirements, but most have no way of recognizing or marking the end of a relationship. Hence, the invitation to share personal items that tell a story about a loss.

This is an unusual concept for a museum, but one that has universal appeal, as everyone has experienced a loss of some sort. It has many kinds of personal items, from teddy bears, to pieces of clothing, to everyday household items, to letters, to pictures, all telling a story of some relationship that ended: a few by death, or separation by war, but most because of a couple splitting up. Each item is exhibited individually and has a board with its story—some very poignant, some funny, some very sad, some angry.

A key bottle opener tells a poignant story

A key bottle opener tells a poignant story

keywriting

The items in one alcove illustrate Whims of Desire

The items in one alcove illustrate Whims of Desire

The museum is housed in an old building—the beautiful baroque Kulmer Palace in the Upper Town (Gradec)—but the interior has been completely re-done. So, it’s modern inside, with very simple, clean lines and excellent lighting. It’s not a large exhibit, but it gets the message across—really capturing the sorrow and hope of a common humanity. We enjoyed reading the story attached to each item, laughing out loud at a few, commiserating with others, totally empathizing with a few, especially those who were using their story as a catharsis for anger. Look at some of the words accompanying the pictures here. The information boards are all in English and Croatian, but using the QR codes visitors can also read the captions in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.

Well worth a couple of hours. There is also a small café and shop.

This little wardrobe tells about breaking a different kind of relationship (see words below)

This little wardrobe tells about breaking a different kind of relationship (see words below)

wardrobewords

A visiting exhibition of new donations plus some from the permanent collection is currently in Amsterdam—in the Oude Kerk cathedral, from November 16, 2013 to March 2, 2014.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:

25kuna/adult (about US$4.50), seniors and students 20 kuna

9am-10:30pm (June 1-September 30),  9am-9pm (October 1-May 31)

Closed November 1, December 25, January 1, and Easter

Sv. Cirila Metoda 2, Upper Town, Zagreb

www.brokenships.com

An ex-axe

An ex-axe

The story of what the axe did in anger!

The story of what the axe did in anger!

Clothes bring memories too

Clothes bring memories too

A 'clandestino' in our apartment during the war

A ‘clandestino’ in our apartment during the war

This iron was used to iron my wedding suit. Now it is the only thing left

This iron was used to iron my wedding suit. Now it is the only thing left

 

Read Full Post »

We see the strange writing on the wall at the back of the cathedral

We see the strange writing on the wall at the back of the cathedral

Zagreb's imposing main cathedral

Zagreb’s imposing main cathedral

Zagreb’s Cathedral, Croatia

In Zagreb, the capital of Croatia, the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Saintly Kings Stephen and Ladislav (wow, that’s quite a mouthful!), is usually just called “the Cathedral” or Katedrala.

Many Croatians are Catholic and this is the country’s main church. It’s a very large imposing Neo-Gothic building, what we see today built a little more than 100 years ago. But, it has a long history, as the first church went up here in 1094 when a diocese was established in Kaptol, one of the two towns that originally made up what is now Zagreb (the other is Gradec, up on the hill). Invading Tartars destroyed the original cathedral in the mid-13th century. The citizens rebuilt it, but an earthquake destroyed it in 1880.

The three main features inside the church are: the main altar with a lovely silver relief

Beautiful cathedral interior and ornate silver altar

Beautiful cathedral interior and ornate silver altar

of the Holy Family; the grave of Josip Jelacic, a Croatian statesman; and the modern tombstone of Alojzije Stepinac. Stepinac, the Archbishop of Zagreb in World War 11, supported the Ustase (puppet Nazi government in Croatia then), believing it would help gain independence from Serbia. For some Croatians he is a hero and inspiration, but for others he is a villain because of this.

However, for me, there is another feature in the cathedral that is even more interesting. As you face the exit to the church, on the left side is an arched wall between pillars. Most of the wall panel is inscribed with a very different script, some kind of writing that I have never seen before, very bold and very obvious in this setting. We photographed it and then I determined to learn more.

We step a little closer to this new (for us) alphabet...

We step a little closer to this new (for us) alphabet…

Apparently it is the Glagolitic alphabet (glagoljca). The popular story is that Cyril and Methodius, Byzantine missionaries in the 9th century, invented it as a way to translate the Bible and church doctrine into Slavic languages. They worked mainly in Moravia (in the eastern Czech Republic today) but it was here in Croatia that it caught on and was used in some places until the 19th century. The name Glagolitic also exists in Macedonian, Serbian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, and Ukrainian.

Other ideas are that Glagolitic was created in the 4th century by St. Jerome, and is then called Hieronymian, but this seems to be less substantiated. Later, it was adapted in Bulgaria and became part of the Cyrillic alphabet, which Russia and Serbia still use. When Croatia gained independence in 1991 there was some idea of making Glagolitic the official alphabet, but this didn’t happen. Nowadays, Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovena use and speak basically the same language: the biggest difference is the writing, as Croatians and Bozniaks use our Roman alphabet, while the Serbs use the Cyrillic alphabet.

Linguists are having fun trying to figure out the history, development and use of this

…and then zoom in. I wonder what this says?

…and then zoom in. I wonder what this says?

strange script, how many letters it had and how the characters were modified and changed.

This web site gives a chart of the alphabet if you are interested,

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/glagolitic.htm

Read Full Post »

Tom Plevnik photography

One picture could change your life.

The Little Blog of Magic

The alluring travel blog.

Celtic Connections and Travels

Many trips over many years to Scotland, Wales and, recently, Ireland, deserve to be grouped together, so here we go!

Lucid Being🎋

STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS - THE STRANGE AND PHILOSOPHICAL. ABSTRACT DIGITAL ART RENDERINGS - Ash Lucid!

kirilson photography

the stories behind the pictures, and vice versa

eatliveescape.wordpress.com/

Ingredients for a Beautiful Life!

Creative Gardens

Grow the Garden You've Always Wanted

Minerva's pencil case

Marilyn's musings

Fotoeins Fotografie

a question of home: 鹹水埠溫哥華? Oder woanders?

Dining with Donald

Donald on dining in and out

Paris1972-Versailles2003

Travel and my anecdotes

Deuxiemepeau Poetry by Damien B. Donnelly

Between the lines and through the lens...

Camellia's Cottage

Lifestyle Blog

Our Visits to Japan

Trying to capture the essence of this lovely country

Sunny District

Welcome to my happy place!

Transplanted Tatar

Travel of the hidden-treasure variety

Odedi's Wine Reviews Blog

Wine reviews so good, you can almost "taste it" !

Korean Experiences

Come travel and explore this lovely country ( South Korea) with Viv and Rod on our latest trips